FAR Review: Changing Tides! What a Wonderful Surprise!

 


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Do you know those games whose existence sounds familiar to you and you could even tell what icon it has but your information about them goes no further? FAR: Lone Sails is one of those games. Getting over its sequel and looking for more information about the studio to try to understand how FAR: Changing Tides had slipped under my radar, I've discovered that its first adventure suffered the same fate.

It is, as you will discover below, a bug that I intend to fix as soon as possible. And it is that if the first game turns out to be half as good as this FAR: Changing Tides, it will be worth approaching him. What a wonderful surprise I have had at the controls.

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FAR: Changing Tides, a memorable trip

Asking you for an afternoon's commitment and demanding little more than your attention, FAR: Changing Tides promises you one of those adventures where you marvel at the landscapes while you solve small puzzles and see how the protagonist overcomes one obstacle after another.

Halfway between being heir to Limbo and taking control of Lovers in a Dangerous Space time 's ship one step further , the game jumps from briefly exploring a world devastated by the greatest of tsunamis to controlling a ship that needs of a puzzle in itself to be able to advance.

With the search for a new place to live as a push, we will have to go through abandoned factories and sunken shelters to improve our boat and get what starts as a mere boat with a sail ends up being a submarine or a hot air balloon.

And in that tiny mix where you go from pulling a lever on a dilapidated tower to filling your ship's boiler and watching it go at full speed, the hours turn into minutes and you're so lost that when you reach the end Knowing there's another game just like it out there that you haven't completed yet is like waking up on Christmas morning to the tree laden with presents.

 


The charm of the simple

Lever a crane with a piece of fishing boat that you can place on the back of your boat to transform it. Take to the sea climbing the mast to moor the sail and move it to measure the wind with the intention of taking the maximum possible speed. Throw yourself into the water with a fishing hook with the intention of hooking it to a wreck from which you can extract resources and thus feed the engine with which to continue advancing because the wind has completely stopped...

The challenges in FAR: Changing Tides are always short enough to keep you entertained and simple enough not to slow you down too much. That lack of complexity may work against you at times by offering you gaps where there's not much to do beyond gawking at the landscapes, but it's that simplicity that pushes the game towards its goal.

As in the story of the fish factory in What Remains of Edith Finch, controlling the ship ends up becoming an automatism that you face with your brain disconnected and, despite being very aware of the challenges you are overcoming, you do it in a state of complete relaxation. Frankly, I couldn't tell you another game capable of awakening that same feeling.

From the little seen and read of FAR: Lone Sails, the greatest achievement of this sequel is knowing how to replicate that introspection, offering a more varied challenge in terms of scenarios and situations, so if you come from there with a smile on your face, I doubt that you manage to erase it in this second installment with a closure flavor.

 

Our's opinion

Visually beautiful and playably relaxing, FAR: Changing Tides is one of those games that knows how to convey calm despite not losing its adventurous spirit. Between perfect storms and situations capable of taking its protagonist to the limit, the walk of just one afternoon that he puts on the table is one of those experiences that is very easy to recommend.

I don't know if the surprise caught me off guard, but I have a feeling that FAR: Changing Tides is one of those games that will stick in my head for a long time. And there, crouched in a corner of my memory, it will wait for any image to awaken its memory and transport me to that peace that comes from being lost in the middle of the ocean with the only company of a sail waiting to be hoisted.

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